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Reviews

By Garth Greenwell, 8/25/2015

By Garth Greenwell, 8/25/2015

THE WILD, REMARKABLE SEX SCENES OF LIDIA YUKNAVITCH

"Yuknavitch’s sex scenes are remarkable among current American novelists, not just for their explicitness but for the way she uses them to pursue questions of agency, selfhood, and the ethical implications of making art."

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The Book of Joan

"Perhaps even more astounding is Yuknavitch’s prescience: readers will be familiar with the figure of Jean de Men, a celebrity-turned–drone-wielding–dictator who first presided over the Wars on Earth and now lords over CIEL, having substituted “all gods, all ethics, and all science with the power of representation, a notion born on Earth, evolved through media and technology.”

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By Jennifer Glaser, 7/31/15

By Jennifer Glaser, 7/31/15

Ms. Difficult

"It is this liberatory experimentation with voice that distinguishes The Small Backs of Children and places it squarely in the realm of the most accomplished experimental fiction."

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Nicole Rudick, 7/10/15

Nicole Rudick, 7/10/15

"The new addition is Lidia Yuknavitch’s The Small Backs of Children. I have never felt so wrung out by a novel and yet simultaneously invigorated. I mean all of this in recommendation: it’s a terrifically good novel and powerfully written, and it’s refreshing to be punched in the gut by a book now and then."

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By Laura Collins-Hughes, 7/4/15

By Laura Collins-Hughes, 7/4/15

'The Small Backs Of Children' by Lidia Yuknavitch

The girl is an artist, and she paints with her own blood: waits for it to flow out of her and colors her canvases with red. Many necessities are in short supply in Lidia Yuknavitch’s furious and tender novel, “The Small Backs of Children” — peace, safety, protection from mortal pain — but blood is never one of them.

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By Valerie Stivers-Isakova, 2/13/13

By Valerie Stivers-Isakova, 2/13/13

Review: Lidia Yuknavitch’s The Chronology of Water — A Body Memoir Gone Viral

“'Viral' is a good meme for a memoir about the body, and seems appropriate for a small book published in 2011 that’s still breaking 50,000 on Amazon, and keeps popping up on blogs and social media feeds. Lidia Yuknavitch’s The Chronology of Water is the kind of book that people don’t just read, but become converted to."

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